Last edited by Ferisar
Tuesday, April 28, 2020 | History

3 edition of The Pennsylvania Abolition Society found in the catalog.

The Pennsylvania Abolition Society

Pennsylvania Abolition Society.

The Pennsylvania Abolition Society

papers, 1775-1975 : Reel 30.

by Pennsylvania Abolition Society.

  • 140 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by University Microfilms International in Ann Arbor .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Reproduction of original.

The Physical Object
FormatMicrofilm
Pagination1 microfilm
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16577456M

to "abolition" and "abolitionist" became oppro brious terms. And so entirely was the meaning changed that the character and work of the real abolition societies is now forgotten or misunderstood. The members of the Pennsylvania Society were all of them quiet, orderly, law-abiding men; their work was efficient and helpful. Pencak explains the importance of the work of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society: it "became the nation's most energetic antislavery organization" (p). Pencak goes on to say, "In Pennsylvania became the first state to begin the gradual abolition of slavery." He writes that "the law stipulated that only thoseAuthor: Stephen E. Maizlish.


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The Pennsylvania Abolition Society by Pennsylvania Abolition Society. Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Pennsylvania Abolition Society Digital Exhibit brings together a series of documents to tell a history of the PAS's work during its crucial battle against slavery in the years before the U.S.

Civil War. The Pennsylvania Abolition Society was founded in at the Rising Sun Tavern in Philadelphia, as a Society for the "Relief for Free Negroes unlawfully held in Bondage." Its mission was later expanded in the s to include "improving the Condition of the African Race.".

The Society was formed by a group of abolitionist Quakers and Anthony Benezet in The Abolition Society was the first in America and served as inspiration for the formation of abolitionist societies in other colonies.

The group focused not only in abolishing slavery. The Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society was established in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in Founders included James Mott, Lucretia Mott, Robert Purvis, and John C.

Bowers.: In AugustWilliam Still while working as a clerk for the Society, was assisting a fugitive slave calling himself "Peter Freedman". As the escapee's story was similar to many he had heard before, it took a while. The Pennsylvania Abolition Society's Mission for Black Education by Margaret Hope Bacon.

The Pennsylvania Abolition Society Today by Theopolis Fair. Window on the Collections: The Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society Papers by Melissa Mandell. Book Reviews by Melissa Mandell.

The following year, in collaboration with the Society of Friends, PAS successfully petitioned the Pennsylvania legislature to amend the gradual abolition act of Growing out of egalitarian concerns of members of the Society of Friends, the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, as it is now known, was founded in as the Society for the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage, but the Revolution caused its early Quaker members to suspend operations untilwhen it reorganized with a broader base.

Memoir of the first American abolition society; scarce to commerce and with no auction records found over the last thirty years. The compiler, Quaker Edward Needles, was serving as president of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society when his book was published. Comprises a thorough record of the society’s activities from its founding inpaying particular attention to their legal and.

Pennsylvania Abolition Society (PAS) Grants Due Date: Janu Please note: We have changed to an email submisson system. PAS, formed by Anthony Benezet and the first abolition society in the world, seeks proposals for its annual grants to its.

Clarkson Institute of Pennsylvania--Minute Book [Ams] () Volume moved. The volume was mistakenly included in processing. It has been removed to its proper collection, the Pennsylvania Abolition Society records (Collection ).

Please see the microfilm guide for the Pennsylvania Abolition Society records for further information. Similar Items. Address of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society Author: Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery Year: ; History of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery: the relief of Negroes unlawfully held in bondage; and for improving the condition of the African race Author: Bacon, Margaret Hope.

Yet as I researched the tactics and strategies of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, the world’s first and now oldest such group, I discovered that early abolitionism differed almost completely from later movements to end slavery—in terms of racial and gender composition, day-to-day tactics, and overall strategies.

in the middle of the. Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, and the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage, later known as The Pennsylvania Abolition Society book Pennsylvania Abolition Society (PAS), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, The Pennsylvania Abolition Society book Rush was an advocate of women's education and of the abolition of slavery.

He became a trustee of the Young Ladies' Academy in Philadelphia in Inhe became the president of the Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery. Rush had 13 children with his wife Julia Stackton. An Act for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery - March 1, Images.

Click images for larger versions. History. Record Group Records of the Department of State, Engrossed Laws. 14 pages, 19" X15", iron gall ink on paper. The enslavement of African servants has a. The Constitution of the Pennsylvania Society, For Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, And the Relief of Free Negroes, Unlawfully Held in Bondage.

Begun in the YearAnd Enlarged on the Twenty-Third of April, To Which are Added, the Acts of the General Assembly of Pennsylvania, for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery.

6 Pennsylvania LEGACIES November FEATURE By Richard S. Newman The Pennsylvania Abolition Society: Restoring a Group to GloryI t is the nature of great events to obscure the great events that came before them,” the noted 19th-century historian Francis Parkman once wrote.

There is no need to tell that to the Pennsylvania Abolition Society. History of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery: the relief of Negroes unlawfully held in bondage; and for improving the condition of the African race Author: Bacon, Margaret Hope. Published: ().

> Pennsylvania Abolition Society» Directory Welcome to AAAM’s global directory of African American Museums and affiliate institutions. This database is comprised of over sites (including: museums, archives, libraries, galleries, historical societies, and cultural centers) and provides a summary profile of their location, contact.

The abolitionist society in Pennsylvania that had been started by ten Quakers reorganized inand three years later became the Pennsylvania Abolition Society (PAS). The two leaders of the organization, as the abolitionist movement gained momentum across the Author: Douglas V.

Gibbs. The following year, in collaboration with the Society of Friends, PAS successfully petitioned the Pennsylvania legislature to amend the gradual abolition act of As a result of the signature petition and other lobbying efforts, the legislature prohibited the transportation of slave children or pregnant women out of Pennsylvania, as.

Book/Printed Material An address to the public, from the Pennsylvania Society for promoting the abolition of slavery, and the relief of free negroes, unlawfully held in bondage Signed by order of the Society, B.

Franklin, President. Philadelphia, 9th of November. The Pennsylvania Society. 43 likes. We of Yale College celebrate the rich historical and cultural traditions of the fine state of Pennsylvania through our involvement in this ers: The Constitution of the Pennsylvania Society, for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery - Exhibited is the May American Museum Magazine full printing of The Constitution of the Pennsylvania Society, for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, and the Relief of Free Negroes, Unlawfully Held in Bondage: begun in the yearand enlarged on the twenty-third of April,   The Society for the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage, the first American society dedicated to the cause of abolition, is founded in Philadelphia on Ap Return to Top of Page Officers, Members and Supporters: Franklin, Benjamin,Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, statesman, inventor, diplomat, lawyer, publisher, author, philosopher, opponent of ent of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, Franklin wrote: “The unhappy man, who has long been treated as a brute animal, too frequently sinks beneath the common standard.

Benjamin Franklin () was an American author, politician, diplomat, scientist, and inventor, as well as one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. As the president of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, Franklin was urged by members of the group to bring up the issue of slavery at the Constitutional Convention ofwhich resulted in the creation of the United States.

The Abolitionists in Pennsylvania Founding of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society (PAS) As early asfour German Quakers in Germantown near Philadelphia protested slavery in a resolution that condemned the "traffic of Men-body." By the s, abolitionism was a full-scale movement in Pennsylvania.

Led by such Quaker activists as Anthony Benezet and John Woolman, many Philadelphia. AN ADDRESS TO THE PUBLIC, FROM THE Pennsylvania Society for promoting the Abolition of Slavery, and the Relief of Free Negroes, unlawfully held in Bondage. IT is with peculiar satisfaction we assure the friends of humanity, that in prosecuting the design of our association, our endeavours have proved successful, far beyond our most sanguine expectations.

Get this from a library. A guide to the microfilm publication of the papers of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society: at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. [Jeffrey Nordlinger Bumbrey; Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery.; Historical Society of Pennsylvania.].

One-third of the original delegates were Quakers, but not all Quakers supported the organization. In Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, an anti-slavery society founded in with twenty members, used petitions to call for immediate abolition and built themselves a meeting hall.

This kind of militancy, along with race riots in Philadelphia and other cities, led yearly and monthly Quaker. Philadelphia was the home to the Society of Friends, which offered the first public attack on slavery in the s; the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, the western world's first antislavery group; and to generations of abolitionists who organized some Format: Hardcover.

Paul Polgar recovers the racially inclusive vision of America's first abolition movement. In showcasing the activities of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, the New York Manumission Society, and their African American allies during the post-Revolutionary and early national eras, he unearths this coalition's comprehensive agenda for black freedom and : Paul J.

Polgar. The Society for the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage, the first American abolition society, was founded on Ap It was established by a group of Quakers, which included Thomas Paine, and held four ers: 4K.

Benjamin Franklin was president of the Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery from until his death in April One of his last public acts was sending this letter and petition to Vice President John Adams, who presided over the Senate.

Franklin, formerly a slaveholder, became an ardent abolitionist after ratification of the U.S. Constitution. The Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery was founded largely by Quakers in The Society petitioned the First Congress () to end slavery, calling the institution an “inconsistency” in the American character.

The Senate took no action; the House, after bitter debate, also failed to abolish slavery before adjourning in The Historical Society of Pennsylvania. Constitution of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society. Eighteen Philadelphians, most of them Quakers, organized the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery and for the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage — known as Philadelphia Abolition Society (PAS) — in accused under the Sedition Act.

Benjamin Franklin. president of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society. Toussaint L'Overture. Haitian slave revolution. Henry Clay. War Hawk. Aaron Burr. shot Alexander Hamilton in a duel. strict constructionist. government could only do exactly what the Constitution stated.

The constitution of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, and the relief of free Negroes unlawfully held in bondage begun in the year and enlarged on the twenty-third of April to which are added, the acts of the General Assembly of.

The Pennsylvania Abolition Society made many attempts to get the state legislature to pass a law ending slavery within the state. It argued in that the state constitution said all men were born equally free, which included Blacks, but it was unsuccessful.

The Society also aided abolition societies in other states. Growing abolitionist activity in the state and the increased influence of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society made the law difficult to enforce.

PAS members, many of whom were lawyers, defended runaways in the courts and lobbied the state legislature to broaden the scope of the law to include complete emancipation.

In the late s, they.Pennsylvania Abolition Society & the Pennsylvania Black. Philadelphia: Pennsylvania Abolition Society, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery.; Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

OCLC Number: Description: 24 pages: illustrations ; 28 cm.The riot at Pennsylvania Hall occurred at a time of backlash against abolitionism, despite its long history in the region.

The Pennsylvania Abolition Society (PAS), the nation’s first and best-known antislavery group, helped secure Pennsylvania’s gradual abolition law, the nation’s first, in In abolitionist allies from New York.